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Crystal Coleman - Social Media Specialist in the Bay Area. Fan of the arts and crafting. Looking for the perfect opportunity.

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2 years ago

[Persephone Magazine] Positivity Challenge Week 8: The Job Search

It’s possibly one of the most demoralizing things that can happen. Whether it’s downsizing, firing, end of a contract, or other reasons, losing a job can be stressful to your mind and body, your finances, and your relationships. On top of the stress of losing your job is the pressure to find another one and quickly. No small feat in today’s job market. Even if you’re not coming off a job loss, a graduate looking for their first job, a recent transplant to another city, or a new mother getting back into the workforce, trying to find a job can be full-time work in itself — one with a pretty high rate of rejection. How do you keep yourself focused and keep from giving up?

This week’s Positivity post is for all you job searchers!

2 years ago | 5 notes

[Persephone Magazine] Positivity Challenge Week 7: Staying Positive at Your Non-Ideal Job

persephonemag:

From the article:

Now, we’re not talking about terrible job situations where you’re being harassed and dreading going to work every day and making yourself psychosomatically ill. That’s a whole different can of worms. Some of these tips might help, but if your job situation is really abusive, the only thing that can help is putting your all into getting yourself out of there as quickly as possible. What I’m talking about is the day-to-day drag of the menial. Jobs that are perfectly adequate, but aren’t your passion. Jobs that you are truly happy just to have, but which wear you down, day in and day out. Jobs like customer service and retail, where even the most Pollyana-ish person can get worn down by the monotony and ordinariness. How do you stay positive when the daily grind is getting you down?

Read more at Persephone Magazine.

 My latest Positivity Article as Persephone Magazine.

Via Persephone Magazine
2 years ago | 2 notes

Telecommuting > Pay Raise (Well, sort of)

betsy-pr:

Note to self: Change your contacts more often and don’t study in the dark. 

This morning I woke up with the worst red eye. I don’t think it was an infection but more like a serious irritation. I’ve been really straining my vision lately by wearing my contacts all day and studying at night for my GRE (which is next week). Hopefully I can afford a pair of glasses when my newly elected vision plan kicks in for the new year. B) 

Nonetheless, I worked from home today and got a TON of things off my to-do list. My productivity felt 1000% higher than my usual work day. I wasn’t being interrupted, I wasn’t taking coffee breaks and I was completely focused from 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. 

I’ve never understood why telecommuting or even working away from my desk at another part of campus is so frowned upon at my workplace. If rent wasn’t skyrocketing in Miami, I would gladly take 2-3 days telecommuting over a pay raise. And this isn’t just me. It’s been proven that most millennials would take telecommuting over a pay raise. 

There’s a great white paper on telecommuting, Workshifting Benefits: The Bottom Line

  • 27% increase in productivity on telecommuting days 

Just about every study of telework cites “lack of management buy-in” as the biggest obstacle to acceptance. It’s clear managers fear that left unmonitored, employees will not work as hard as they otherwise would. 

In fact, study after study shows that people who telecommute are more productive than their office counterparts. Contributing factors include: 

• Fewer interruptions: Telecommuters are not distracted by the many time drains that take place in a traditional office— morning chatter, coffee breaks, long lunches, rumor mills, birthday parties, football pools, etc.

• More effective time management: Email and other asynchronous communications can be time-managed  more effectively and are less apt to include non-work digressions.

• Feeling like a trusted employee: A sense of empowerment and commitment is consistently shown to be one of the highest contributors to employee job satisfaction.

• Flexible hours: For those who are able to flex their hours as well as their location, workshifting allows them to work when they are most productive.

I think that most managers, especially those directly supervising young talent, should take the time to skim through the white paper. 

I’m not sitting here making excuses for young folks (including myself) on transiting into responsible adults in the work force. However, I think both employees and managers can strike a balance. At least for your departmental budget’s sake. 

Would you take telecommuting over a pay raise? Let me know. 

I think it would definitely be something I would have to think about, especially if I had a really long or really full of traffic commute. It definitely takes a lot of focus and dedication to make a telecommuting situation work.

Via Betsy Soler
2 years ago | 49 notes
futurejournalismproject:

Good jobs. Literally.
Good is hiring on both the West and East coast.

I probably shouldn’t pimp this out since I’ll totally be submitting my interest for the Social Media Manager position, but definitely check this out if you’re a fan of Good. Or a fan of working for responsible, ethical, dog friendly companies in general.
(Does that sound like brown-nosing since I’m definitely putting the link to this tumblr on my resume? Yes? No?)

futurejournalismproject:

Good jobs. Literally.

Good is hiring on both the West and East coast.

I probably shouldn’t pimp this out since I’ll totally be submitting my interest for the Social Media Manager position, but definitely check this out if you’re a fan of Good. Or a fan of working for responsible, ethical, dog friendly companies in general.

(Does that sound like brown-nosing since I’m definitely putting the link to this tumblr on my resume? Yes? No?)

(Source: futurejournalismproject)

Via Mother Jones magazine on Tumblr